Extra Extra : Food

Seafood workers held against their will may be catching the fish you eat

Following a year-long investigation, the AP has uncovered an intricate web of slave-caught seafood. Reporters spoke with more than 40 current and former slaves in Benjina, an island village in Indonesia, and, with the help of a sympathetic worker, the AP was able to capture footage of workers being held against their will, in cages, barely big enough to lay down in.

The slave-caught fish can wind up in the supply chains of some of America's major grocery stores, such as Kroger, Albertsons and Safeway; the nation's largest retailer, Wal-Mart; and the biggest food distributor, Sysco. It can ...

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Extra Extra Round-up: Whistleblowing farmers, no oversight for IT contractors, and grand jury investigating landfill contractor

Cock Fight: Meet the Farmer Blowing the Whistle on Big Chicken | Fusion

Craig Watts is a chicken farmer – and now, a whistleblower. Fusion documented Watts’ journey, from his struggle to speak out to the reaction of his employers: Perdue Farms. Two months after going public with his grievances, Watts says he has been visited 26 times by company representatives and even placed on a “performance improvement plan.” Meanwhile, the majority of chicken farmers live at or below the poverty line, four companies control more than half of the industry, and animals are subjected to insufferable living conditions.

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Veterinarians face conflicting allegiances to animals, farmers - and drug companies

Veterinarians are taking a crucial new role in public health in 2016 -- gatekeepers to tons of farm animal antibiotics now freely dispensed without prescription and contributing to a surge of antibiotic-resistant "superbugs" that infect people.

What will the companies selling antibiotics do about that? A Reuters investigation found broad, pervasive and mostly undisclosed financial ties between drugmakers and veterinarians:

Pharma companies gave $3.3 million to the main U.S. veterinary association over the past four years. Zoetis, the world's largest animal drug maker, named a prominent veterinary dean to its board at $240,000 a year, almost doubling ...

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Extra Extra Monday: Drug-addicted nurses, police shootings and lottery winners

Addicted nurses steal patients’ drugs | The News Leader (Staunton, VA)

A statewide investigation by The News Leader found about 900 nurses publicly disciplined by the licensing board from 2007 to mid-2013 for drug theft and use at work.

Across Virginia, scores of patients in pain during the last decade were denied necessary medication because a nurse was stealing it.

 

In 179 fatalities involving on-duty NYPD cops in 15 years, only 3 cases led to indictments — and just 1 conviction | New York Daily News

A Staten Island grand jury’s decision not to indict white NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo for the ...

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A 20-year-old’s death hints at trouble in the multi-billion dollar rehab industry

Brandon Jacques’s parents flew their son to a far-away rehab center in hopes it’d cure him of his worsening bulimia and alcoholism.

Instead, Jacques was passed around and failed by an unregulated and profit-driven system, cut off from communicating with his family. He eventually died after going into cardiac arrest at a detox center at which the family didn’t even know he was living, according to an investigation by Vice.

Across the country, legislators have struggled to keep up with the fast-growing and supremely expensive non-hospital rehab industry. Fueled by the commercialization of rehab through reality TV ...

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U.S. food aid program struggles to move forward

The U.S. government spends more than half of its international food aid budget transporting life-saving commodities through a tangled system of special interests and government bureaucracy – more than $9 billion in taxpayer dollars over the past decade, a Medill/USA Today investigation has found.

That makes it by far the most inefficient and expensive food assistance delivery system in the world, and one that delays or deprives sustenance to potentially millions of people who desperately need it—and in some cases, die without it, according to interviews with dozens of U.S. officials and experts, and a review of ...

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Politicians' food tab takes $14.5M bite from donations

House members and candidates have spent at least $14.5 million of their donors' campaign contributions on food since Jan. 1, 2011, a USA TODAY analysis shows.

The expenses range from thousands of dollars to underwrite big fundraising lunches in their home districts to meal tabs at country clubs, glitzy New York hotels and Washington steakhouses. Politicians and their aides also spent donors' money at far less glamorous destinations, such as Dunkin' Donuts and Five Guys Burgers and Fries.

Unchecked irrigation threatens to sap Minnesota groundwater

Crop irrigation has boomed in Minnesota in the past few years, increasing land values and raising yields for corn, soybeans and other crops. But hundreds of Minnesota farmers appear to be irrigating cropland without the state permits required to use large volumes of public water, according to Minnesota Public Radio News.

Of roughly 1,200 crop irrigation wells drilled from 2008 to 2012, more than 200 likely are operating without a permit, a Minnesota Public Radio News investigation of public well records found. In addition, nearly 200 others operated without a permit until the past year or so.

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Government computer glitch left thousands in N.C. without food stamps

Thousands of people went without food stamps in North Carolina last year after government computers across the state crashed, according to the Huffington Post.

According to the report:

"The food stamp delays can be traced to troubles with a computer system designed by Accenture, one of the world’s largest consulting firms. The company is among a small group of politically connected technology contractors that receive government business across the country despite previous criticism of their work.

Accenture won the North Carolina contract after spending thousands of dollars on political contributions and lobbying in the state. North Carolina hired Accenture ...

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