Tags : disasters

Coverage guide for aviation safety

A Boeing jetliner operated by the airline Asiana crashed and caught fire at San Francisco International Airport on its arrival from Seoul on Saturday, killing at least two people and injuring more than 100 others. The National Transportation Safety Board has announced it will investigate, but it could take years to determine the cause of the crash.

For journalists covering the crash, the IRE Resource Center has an Aviation coverage guide that will help you figure out what background you need to know, what questions to ask and key sources in the aviation industry. In it, you’ll find several ...

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Investigating in the aftermath of natural and man-made a disasters

By Gwen Girsdansky

Reporters and editors from The Oklahoman, Newsday, CBS News and WFAA shared their secrets for covering disasters Friday at the 2013 IRE Conference. 

Paul Monies of The Oklahoman recommended having a “go bag” ready before a disaster strikes. Fill it with items like a full change of clothes for after a night in the newsroom or out reporting, rain coat and rain boots, and equipment and batteries. Brett Shipp of WFAA in Dallas-Fort Worth was adamant that you should fill up the bathtub as soon as you check into wherever you are staying, just in case the ...

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Resources for coverage of the Oklahoma tornado

Moore, Okla. and the surrounding area are still reeling after the impact of a 2 mile-wide tornado yesterday. As damage is assessed and the death and injury tolls remain uncertain, journalists are working to obtain and verify information for the public. Many of IRE's members have been there before and have passed on their knowledge. To aid reporters on the story who are unfamiliar with covering natural disasters and newsrooms looking for help in their coverage of the disaster, IRE has compiled several of its resources and external links that can help guide reporting in the aftermath of such ...

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Money trail for Sandy begins as Congress approves $51 billion in disaster aid

On Monday Congress approved $51 billion in disaster aid for victims of Hurricane Sandy, three months after the storm that killed more than 130 people and caused billions in damage to the Atlantic coast.

Follow the money with IRE's coverage page, Hurricane Sandy: Covering the Aftermath

The spending was heavily debated and at a time sparked bipartisan anger over the inability of Congress to provide timely relief. In addition to a reluctance to add to federal debt, concerns about the bill from House Republicans centered on trying to make sure the money was actually being spent on emergency needs ...

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SBA disaster loan data updated in NICAR Database Library

In the wake of a disaster, individuals and business owners are often left with severely damaged property. Many turn for help to the Small Business Administration, which approves low-interest loans to help rebuild. For declared disasters in 2011 alone, the Small Business Administration approved over $1 billion in loans.

NICAR has updated the SBA database of these loans, which is now current through Sept. 2012. 

WHAT'S IN IT?
Disaster loans through the SBA are one of the primary forms of federal assistance for individuals and non-farm, private-sector businesses who have suffered losses. The data have information on the borrower ...

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Hurricane Sandy: How data journalists spread information about the storm

Google Crisis Response created this interactive map showing weather, emergency shelters and power authorities.
 

As the East cost braced for Hurricane Sandy, data journalists across the country were working in realtime to spread the news. We gathered some of the interesting interactive coverage and data visualizations we found from around the web. Have a suggestion for our list? Send it to tony@ire.org or tweet us @IRE_NICAR.

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Haiti's Aftershocks

Collaborative watchdog group follows the funds for rebuilding

When a massive earthquake killed some 200,000 people and devastated Haiti, billions of aid dollars poured in from aroundthe globe. Groups such as “God’s Pit Crew” and “Drops of Hope”descended on the island, ostensibly to help people rebuild their lives.

Although many of us in Haiti had lost friends, family, homes and offices, a group of Haitian journalists banded together soon after thedisaster to follow the money to make sure it really was offering hope.

A student journalist questions a man about his son’s case of cholera at ...
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