Tags : GIS

Passes for ArcView mapping sessions to be distributed Friday morning of CAR Conference

Those interested in taking the mapping classes (to qualify for the Esri ArcView software) at the 2013 CAR Conference must show up for the Friday morning session beginning at 7:30 a.m. at the Keeneland room. Slots in the class will be distributed until they are gone. If more than 24 people want to take the course, additional slots will be handed out for the Sunday morning sessions at that time. If 24 or fewer people show up on Thursday, there will not be a Sunday class. (Sunday sessions would begin at 9 a.m. and end by 11 ...

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Esri offers free ArcGIS license to CAR Conference attendees

For those of you interested in getting started with mapping, we have great news: Esri is offering a free license to ArcGIS Desktop, a $1,500 value, for Louisville Conference attendees who attend the following four conference sessions:

Friday, March 1
  • 9 - 9:50 a.m. Mapping 1: Displaying data geographically (hands-on)
  • 10 - 10:50 a.m. Mapping 2: Importing and selecting data by attribute (hands-on)
  • 11 - 11:50 a.m. Mapping 3: Geocoding to merge databases with addresses into maps (hands-on)
  • 2 - 2:50 p.m. Esri session in the demo room

Please note: Seating is limited and will ...

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GIS tracks housing health

This project started with a call from a single mother of two teenagers who asked me to take a look at the rat-hole apartment where they lived in an old house that had been carved up into several apartments.

It was horrible. There was a foot of snow on the ground; the furnace had never worked; the water pipes had broken; the living room ceiling had collapsed as a result. The apartment was uninhabitable.  

The management company had washed its hands and told her to talk to the owner. But that person turned out not to be the real owner ...

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Bailed-out banks buying tax liens

After I learned the banks that had been bailed out by taxpayers had become the main purchasers of tax liens in Arizona, I knew I was onto a potentially big story.

I began interviewing several tax lien buyers and found that this was a common practice not only in Tucson and throughout Arizona, but all over the country. My goal was to use what was happening here as a window into the larger story.

From the beginning, I thought the key to the story was the fact that the bailed-out banks were using money to buy up tax liens rather ...

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Mapping it Out: Population growth around nuke plants

Our biggest mistake was thinking it’d be easy.

In late 2009, long before the nuclear accident in Japan, I had embarked on an investigative series on nuclear power. Under the direction of Associated Press National Investigative Editor Rick Pienciak, I was examining how well nuclear power plants hold up as they age. I was focusing on considering harmful factors within the plants, everything from radiation to rust. Soon, I began to wonder about safety outside the plants’ grounds. Had population growth in surrounding communities undermined what was once viewed as a fundamental safety feature of the plants: remote locations ...

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Mapping, health data, show Utah's ashtma ghettos

Utah is considered one of the healthiest states in the country. We enjoy some of the lowest rates of smoking, binge drinking, preventable hospitalizations and cancer deaths.

But the state's relative good health masks the reality that Utah has some of the worst disparities when you look at health outcomes and access to healthcare by where people live, their income and their race and ethnicity.

The Salt Lake Tribune launched the series Healthy for Whom in January to explore why some neighborhoods are ghettos of poor health. The latest installment was about how certain neighborhoods have higher rates of ...

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Race gaps in Ohio loans uncovered by stats analysis

Fred Steed has a six-figure income as a top official with the Montgomery County health district. The 66-year-old African-American director of community health has a wife with a good job at a local hospital. He has an 820 credit score. He owns the 1,344-square-foot home in West Dayton where he grew up.

What he doesn't have and can't get: a $35,000 refinance loan.

Steed is one of hundreds of upper-income blacks to be denied loans in the Dayton, Ohio region. A statistical analysis by the Dayton Daily News found that in 2008, upper-income blacks in the ...

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Getting some help with open source GIS

Gary Sherman's Desktop GIS: Mapping the Planet with Open Source Tools

When journalists are looking for software, they usually greet the words "open source" in one of two ways: with confusion, because open source software is still a daunting mystery; or with delight, because the software is available for free.

Open source software is simply software that is available at no cost and has its source code available to the public. A network of users and developers constantly enhances and expands the program.

Journalists doing CAR have been using robust open-source tools for editing documents, analyzing spreadsheet data and ...

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Web maps localize Iowa air pollution story

Des Moines Register reporters Chase Davis and Perry Beeman spent months compiling and making sense of data for a series on air pollution in Iowa. But, with more than 1,600 polluting facilities across the state, there simply wasn’t space in the stories to mention any but the most noteworthy. That’s where data editor James Wilkerson and digital projects editor Michael Corey came in. They developed an interactive map that allowed users to see information about the facilities near them. "It localized the story to basically every community in Iowa," Davis said of the map. It also gave ...

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Making sense of incomplete bird-strike data

It’s almost a tradition in Washington. If you’ve got some bad news to release, put it out on a Friday and hope it gets no more than a for-the-record story that many will overlook.

That’s not to say the Federal Aviation Administration was hoping for an under-the-radar reception when it released its database of aircraft wildlife strikes on a Friday morning in April. Still, the difficulties of doing a substantial story on a Friday, when many in the government are getting ready to leave town, were there nonetheless.

When a US Airways plane carrying 155 people crash-landed ...

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