Tags : international

Social media proves stronger than print during Ukraine protests

This post was originally published at Newsroom by the Bay

By Elijah Akhtarzad

The Investigative Reporters and Editors conference held at the Marriott Hotel in San Francisco on June 27 included a first-hand account of the YanukovychLeaks discovery from journalists Olesya Ivanova and Denys Bigus. Both reporters were on the scene at Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovych’s home immediately following his ouster from power and the discovery of thousands of hidden documents that were thrown into a nearby lake.

Ivanova and Bigus lived in Yanukovych’s home for more than seven days, reviving the wet documents that would reveal the ...

Read more ...

Catch up with some of IRE’s international members

While many of our members work in the United States, hundreds of international journalists contribute to the IRE community. IRE membership stretches from Australia to Argentina. It includes journalists in more than 50 countries, including Pakistan, Kenya, India, Finland and Switzerland. We asked a few of our international members to tell us what they’ve been working on.


Screen shot from Neue Zürcher Zeitung
Swiss data journalism team investigates commercial interests of those with parliamentary access

About 400 people have a badge that allows them to access the Swiss Federal Assembly in Berne. The Swiss daily Neue Zürcher ...

Read more ...

Global Investigative Journalism Network launches crowdfunding campaign

The Global Investigative Journalism Network today launched a new crowdfunding campaign, raising funds to bring promising journalists from developing countries to the Global Investigative Journalism Conference and provide them with state-of-the-art training in investigative reporting, data journalism and cross-border collaboration.

The crowdfunding campaign is done through Indiegogo, and the campaign video features reporters in Kenya, Macedonia, Pakistan and Tunisia.

Despite publicity for transparency, fear and self-censorship in Tanzania

Anti-press attacks are generating fear and self-censorship among journalists in Tanzania, according to a report published Wednesday by The Committee to Protect Journalists. Despite good international publicity for moving toward an open government, public discontent remains largely unseen and unheard.

CPJ's findings include 10 serious anti-press attacks since September, which is "a notable jump over historical trends in the country. In September 2012, veteran cameraman Daudi Mwangosi was killed while covering an opposition rally in a rural area outside Iringa when a police officer fired a tear gas canister at him at close range."

Among CPJ recommendations for the ...

Read more ...

Countries with longtime FOI laws have less corruption, better human development

The Center for Law and Democracy rates FOI law effectiveness by country.

Freedom of Information Act advocates have consistently claimed that institutionalizing the right to information will benefit countries, particularly in addressing corruption.

They are not lying.

By comparing indices on corruption, human development, and years of having an FOI law across 168 countries, I found support to the assumption that having an FOI law leads to lower levels of perceived corruption.

Also, countries with older FOI laws tend to have higher levels of human development than countries with younger FOI laws or countries without them.

An intriguing link, however ...

Read more ...

How this year's CAR Conference turned Australian journalist Edmund Tadros on to programming

Edmund Tadros, a journalist at The Australian Financial Review, said he used to dismiss the idea that journalists needed to know how to program. He considered it a waste of time. Even after he took some basic courses in web programming, and learned how to create interactive tables for his news organization's site, he remained unconvinced.

Then, as he wrote for Australia's The Walkley Magazine, he attended the 2013 CAR Conference in Louisville, Ky., where the confluence of journalists, programmers and bourbon was potent enough to push him toward data.

"The conference was host to the full spectrum ...

Read more ...

Outside the U.S., reporting amid danger

By Perla Arellano

In areas such as Mexico and parts of the Middle East, many journalists have died in their role as watchdogs.

At the recent IRE Conference in San Antonio, the session “Reporting amid danger: When journalist are targeted and newsrooms are infiltrated” included Tim Johnson from McClatchy Newspapers, Gaston Monge Estrada from El Universal, Rana Sabbagh from Arab Reporters for Investigative Journalism, and Andrew Donohue from The Center of Investigative Reporting as moderator.

Many journalists have died because of their work in Mexico after reporting on drug gangs and crime, and many times officers write it off as ...

Read more ...

Investigating trafficking across the U.S.-Mexico border

By Kolten Parker and Perla Arellano

Keeping a low profile and scavenging online court records are vital when covering drug trafficking across the United States-Mexico border.

San Antonio Express-News reporter Jason Buch, Knight International Journalism Fellow Jorge Luis Sierra and Belo Corp. border bureau chief Angela Kocherga discussed tools and strategies they utilize to investigate illegal activity in Mexico.

Buch’s techniques include digging through court records using PACER. He said he cross-references bare-bones indictments with civil suits such as asset forfeitures to paint a broader picture for the reader. That cross-referencing unearths interesting facts that might not otherwise come ...

Read more ...

Day two of the IRE Conference, in pictures

Day two of the IRE Conference in San Antonio featured the event's showcase panel, "The Government's War on Leaks". IRE board member Leonard Downie Jr. moderated a panel featuring Michael Oreskes of the Associated Press, Lucy Dalglish of the Phillip Merrill College of Journalism, author James Bamford, and independent journalist Quinn Norton. The panelists discussed NSA data gathering, the Department of Justice surveillance of journalists. The discussion focused on the relationship between the government, journalists and their sources, how journalists can use secure communications and the role of journalists in protecting whistleblowers.

Friday also featured the Best of ...

Read more ...

ICIJ discusses offshore project for broad-ranging audience

IRE hosted a Google Hangout on Tuesday with members of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, who discussed their ongoing investigation into offshore banking secrets. The reporting began with a leaked cache of 2.5 million records, and has since involved -- at last count -- 86 journalist in 47 countries.

Viewers from all over the world tuned in to learn more about ICIJ's project. Cities with live viewers included Chicago, London, Madrid, Narpes in Finland, New York and San Diego.

In a discussion moderated by Wendell Cochran, former IRE board member and Senior Editor of the Investigative Reporting Workshop, the ...

Read more ...