Tags : justice

IRE Radio Podcast: Killed by the Cops

How many times a year do police kill people? And what happens to officers after they fire a fatal shot? Those were just some of the questions prompted by the deaths of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri and Eric Garner in New York. On this episode of the IRE Radio Podcast we’ll be talking to some of the journalists working to answer those questions.

Here’s the lineup:

  • Rob Barry and Coulter Jones walk through how they found and reported on a problem with the FBI’s system for tracking police killings. The story ran in the Wall Street ...

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Behind the Story: How the WSJ uncovered a flawed system of reporting police killings

Rob Barry (left) and Coulter Jones (right)

Rob Barry and Coulter Jones set out to analyze police killings, not poke holes in the system that tracks them.

But when their sources started questioning the way they’d looked at the numbers – questioning, really, the numbers themselves – the two decided there was a more fundamental issue to be explored.

Their December report for the Wall Street Journal found that the FBI’s national tally of police killings didn’t include hundreds of such incidents from the six-year period they examined. Barry and Jones received information from 105 of the largest police ...

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Arrest, conviction data shed light on repeat drunken drivers in Wisconsin

The I-Team created an interactive visualization showing OWIs in each county.

Consistently named as the state with the highest number of binge drinkers in the nation, alcohol is tightly woven through Wisconsin’s culture. Drinking and driving, despite the many programs aimed at educating drivers about its dangers, is widespread, and Wisconsin remains the only state in the nation where first-time driving while intoxicated is not a crime.

Impaired driving has been the subject of many investigative projects over the years throughout the state, but the Gannett Wisconsin Media Investigative Team chose to narrow its focus considerably in November when ...

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3 ideas for covering America’s booming prison population

The United States is a world leader in incarceration, with more than 2 million people in prisons and jails. At the 2014 IRE Conference Barry Krisberg, a senior fellow at UC Berkeley Law School, discussed a handful of trends for journalists to follow in the coming year. Here are three to keep an eye on:

1. Lawsuits and conditions stemming from the Americans with Disabilities Act

Every correctional facility is subject to the ADA, but officials are still figuring out how to comply with it. Journalists can keep tabs on the resulting lawsuits – cases Krisberg says will be a "slam ...

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Behind the Story: How Chicago Magazine exposed the truth about the city’s crime rates

Chicago Magazine | June 2014

A story that helped change the way Chicagoans digest crime stats started with suspicion.

Immersed in a different crime-related piece, Chicago Magazine Features Editor David Bernstein and Contributing Writer Noah Isackson noticed something amiss with the statistics. When their trusted police sources voiced skepticism, the early trappings of an idea took hold.

In the spring of 2013, fresh off a year of 507 murders in Chicago, the most of any U.S. city, Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy started celebrating what the stats showed was a drastic turnaround in the amount of crime ...

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Federal, state data used to track civil asset forfeitures in Virginia

When police seize cash, cars and other property, it’s usually taken through a legal process known as civil asset forfeiture.

Critics say the system gives police a financial incentive to take property with relative ease and makes it difficult for people to get it back.

We wanted to take a look at how much money is flowing through local departments as a result of this process. It turned out to be a lot.

In Virginia, agencies received more than $57 million over the past six years, according to the findings of a Virginian-Pilot examination of state and federal data ...

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Watch live: Google Hangout on execution secrecy

Today starting at 12 p.m. CDT we’ll be talking about how to investigate the death penalty and shed light on secrecy surrounding lethal injection practices. To watch the broadcast and submit questions, click here. You can also tweet us questions at @IRE_NICAR using the hashtag #IREHangout.

We’ll be joined by four journalists who have been covering executions: Ziva Branstetter of the Tulsa World, Chris McDaniel of St. Louis Public Radio, Brian Haas of The Tennessean and Della Hasselle, a contributor to The Lens.

After the broadcast, the recording will be posted to our Hangouts page.

Join us Wednesday for a Google Hangout on execution secrecy

Tune in Wednesday at 12 p.m. CDT to discuss coverage of the death penalty and the secrecy surrounding lethal injection procedures. We’ll be joined by four journalists who have been investigating executions:

  • Ziva Branstetter, enterprise editor at the Tulsa World and one of the witnesses to the botched Oklahoma execution of Clayton Lockett. You can follow her coverage of the case here.
  • Chris McDaniel, political reporter for St. Louis Public Radio. McDaniel has been involved in a lawsuit to free up information surrounding lethal injection drugs. Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon also recently won IRE’s not-so-coveted Golden Padlock ...
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Journalists discuss reporting on wrongful convictions

By Emily Burns

David Krajicek was a reporter at the New York Daily News in 1989 when the Central Park jogger case grabbed the attention of all of New York. Krajicek was assigned to report on the case, and at a panel on the media’s role in reporting in wrongful convictions on Thursday, Krajicek said errors were made in the overall reporting of the case.

Since then, Krajicek has continued to report on criminal justice, and also studies media’s influence and role in wrongful convictions. This past winter, Krajicek looked into three wrongful conviction cases to see what ...

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Multiple data sets used to track fugitives who go free

In December 2011, a man fleeing from a drug robbery shot and killed New York City police officer Peter Figoski. New York reacted with understandable outrage, particularly when newspapers there revealed that the officer’s killer, Lamont Pride, should have been in jail at the time.

The police in Greensboro, N.C. were already after Pride on charges that he had shot another man during an argument. But when Pride ...

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