Tags : programming

Where to begin if you're learning to code

Last weekend IRE hosted a new bootcamp for journalists to learn web scraping and programming in Python.  IRE offers workshops like this often -- check our events and training page for opportunities to learn new data skills. But if you were unable to make a bootcamp or just can't wait until NICAR14 to start learning, here are some resources to help you begin.  

WHERE TO START

Bento: http://www.bentobox.io/ 
Bento is a diagram to walk you through where to begin when you want to learn coding.  You can begin with HTML and watch as your next step languages ...

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Learn to build a web scraper at IRE's new workshop

A special workshop in programming for journalism, Oct. 10-13, 2013 at the University of Missouri-Columbia.

IRE and the University of Missouri Journalism School are offering a special workshop Oct. 10-13 that will introduce the basics of newsroom programming by teaching how to build one of the simplest but most useful tools in a data journalist's toolbox: a web scraper designed to automate the downloading of data. The workshop will also teach basic data-cleaning skills needed to prepare a dataset of public records for analysis.  

The course will be taught using Python, but the concepts will be applicable to any ...

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New workshop: Building a webscraper

A special workshop in programming for journalism, Oct. 10-13, 2013 at the University of Missouri-Columbia.

IRE and the University of Missouri Journalism School are offering a special workshop Oct. 10-13 that will introduce the basics of newsroom programming by teaching how to build one of the simplest but most useful tools in a data journalist's toolbox: a web scraper designed to automate the downloading of data. The workshop will also teach basic data-cleaning skills needed to prepare a dataset of public records for analysis.  

The course will be taught using Python, but the concepts will be applicable to any ...

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How this year's CAR Conference turned Australian journalist Edmund Tadros on to programming

Edmund Tadros, a journalist at The Australian Financial Review, said he used to dismiss the idea that journalists needed to know how to program. He considered it a waste of time. Even after he took some basic courses in web programming, and learned how to create interactive tables for his news organization's site, he remained unconvinced.

Then, as he wrote for Australia's The Walkley Magazine, he attended the 2013 CAR Conference in Louisville, Ky., where the confluence of journalists, programmers and bourbon was potent enough to push him toward data.

"The conference was host to the full spectrum ...

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Dashboards for reporting

Think of a data dashboard as a bird’s-eye view of data that gets automatically updated in real-time. It’s like a news app meant only for internal use, and the ultimate goal is to make repeat reporting processes more efficient. Aaron Bycoffe of The Huffington Post and Derek Williams and Jacob Harris of The New York Times explained this on Saturday.

Dashboards work best when reporters and developers collaborate to determine the information that would be most useful to display. And they’re flexible: If things change, you can always go back and add new fields or take others ...

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Knight-Mozilla OpenNews announces 2013 fellows

Knight-Mozilla OpenNews yesterday announced its 2013 class of fellows, who will work as developers and technologists embedded in newsrooms around the world. Fellows spend a year writing code along with reporters, designers and newsroom developers to create new tools for journalism. Fellows for 2013 and their placements include:

  • Brian Abelson, The New York Times
  • Manuel Aristarán, La Nacion
  • Annabel Church, Zeit Online
  • Stijn Debrouwere, The Guardian
  • Friedrich Lindenberg, Spiegel Online
  • Sonya Song, Boston Globe
  • Mike Tigas, ProPublica
  • Noah Veltman, BBC

Learn more about the fellows from Knight-Mozilla OpenNews.

Hurricane Sandy: How data journalists spread information about the storm

Google Crisis Response created this interactive map showing weather, emergency shelters and power authorities.
 

As the East cost braced for Hurricane Sandy, data journalists across the country were working in realtime to spread the news. We gathered some of the interesting interactive coverage and data visualizations we found from around the web. Have a suggestion for our list? Send it to tony@ire.org or tweet us @IRE_NICAR.

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Importing RSS and ATOM feeds

Here’s how to use Google Spreadsheets to import RSS and ATOM data.

ImportFeed for RSS and ATOM

All sorts of data gets pushed out as RSS/ATOM feeds. You can put those in spreadsheets too. The command takes the following form:

=ImportFeed(URL, [feedQuery | itemQuery], [headers], [numItems])

  • URL of the feed.
  • We'll almost always use itemQuery options ("items", "items author", "items title", "items summary", "items url", or "items created"), as they return individual items in the feed while feedQuery just returns metadata about the feed.
  • "Items" will be the best default option, as it returns everything you'll ...
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EveryBlock Goes Open Source

By now you may have read that EveryBlock, a Knight Foundation-funded project, has released its source code to the public (here's a browsable version). Getting a chance to look under the hood is a great opportunity to see how other folks tackle some of the tasks we all face, or are likely to. The first thing to note is that the code has the GPL license, which means that if you incorporate any of it into an application you're building and then release that code, it will need to be under the terms of the GPL as well ... Read more ...

Data, APIs and TimesOpen

On Feb. 20, a group of my colleagues at The New York Times gathered for a daylong series of presentations on a set of APIs that we've been releasing during the past few months. TimesOpen, as it was called, gathered about 140 developers and other folks interested in working with Times data. So what are APIs? The acronym stands for "application programming interface," but another way of describing an API is a programmatic way to access data. Rather than perform SQL queries to return the data you want, you'd use your browser or a script to retrieve data ... Read more ...