Resource Center

Stories

 

 

 

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 26,000 investigative stories — both print and broadcast.

These stories are searchable online or by contacting the Resource Center directly (573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org) where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Browse or search the tipsheet section of our library below. Stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center.

 

 

 



Search results for "Abuse" ...

  • Cleveland Captives Rescued

    CBS had exclusive information breaking news in this high profile case including the captor’s suicide note and its contents, that one of the women was forced to deliver the other woman’s baby impregnated by the captor, and resuscitated the baby when it was born not breathing, and how the women were chained and beaten repeatedly and what they said to police at time of rescue and other details about their ordeal. Our exclusive CBS reports were quoted extensively by other national media organizations.

    Tags: Suicide; rape; sexual abuse

    By Scott Pelley

    CBS News

    2013

  • Letter Confirms St. John's Abbey Knew About Clergy Two Years Before Releasing Names to Public

    St. John’s Abbey in Collegeville, Minn., released a list of 18 monks who sexually abused children on December 9, 2013. The St. John’s Abbey said the list was unveiled to achieve transparency. Through a letter obtained by UTVS News, we revealed that the St. John's Abbey knew about credible allegations of sexual abuse by Father Dominic Keller in July 2011, more than two years before Keller's name was made public by the St. John's Abbey on Dec. 9, 2013. Moreover, we found only 3 of the 18 names were new to the public. This story, done on a 48-hour deadline by UTVS News Reporter Nick Minock at St. Cloud State University, gives a voice to victims and informs viewers that at least two monks, who are credibly accused of sexually abusing minors at St. John's Abbey, still work in Minnesota parishes.

    Tags: St. John's Abbey; Dominic Keller;

    By Nick Minock

    USTVS

    2013

  • Moms: Hospital Killed Our Kids

    The outside of the Kentucky Children's Hospital is all colorful paintings and smiling photos, but inside there's a dark secret. Connor Wilson was the first to die, on August 30, at six months old. His parents, while heartbroken, didn't think anything was amiss until another baby in the same ward, Rayshawn Lewis-Smith, died. Then they found out Waylon Rainey, also on the cardiac surgery floor, coded and was on life support and a fourth baby, Jaxon Russell needed a second surgery at another hospital to fix a heart surgery he'd had a Kentucky Children's. All of these events happened within eight weeks, after which the hospital closed its cardiac surgery program and placed its chief surgeon on leave. When the parents asked the hospital questions, the hospital wouldn't answer them. When a local reporter started asking questions, the hospital sued her. When the state Attorney General asked these same basic questions - how many pediatric heart surgeries they did, their mortality rates - the hospital refused to hand over the data. When the AG ruled they were in violation of state law by not releasing their data, the hospital appealed the ruling. Now the hospital says they plan to re-open their pediatric cardiac surgery program, and these parents are up in arms. How could the hospital possibly open back up with this kind of track record, without even releasing the most basic safety data, which many other hospitals release all the time? And why haven't state or federal regulators rushed in to stop the program from re-opening - they haven't even opened an investigation. Elizabeth Cohen investigates.

    Tags: Kentucky Children's Hospital; child abuse; cardiac surgery

    By Elizabeth Cohen

    CNN

    2013

  • Pain Pillar Investigated by DEA

    Our attraction to the story of deaths at a clinic run by Dr. Lynn Webster was simple irony. We marveled at how a clinic run by someone who is considered -- at least among pain physicians -- the leading voice about safely prescribing opioids -- could have had so many deaths. Webster is the president of the American Academy of Pain Medicine and the author of the "Opioid Risk Tool," a checklist that is said to enable doctors to distinguish painkiller addicts from legitimate pain patients. Our initial off-the-record conversations indicated that the Drug Enforcement Agency was investigating a number hovering around 100 deaths. Webster acknowledged, and later denied, up to 20 deaths at the clinic over two decades. Of course, an investigation like this is fraught with complexity. There is the issue of monies that Webster receives from the pharmaceutical industry, and how that might influence his philosophy about prescribing, and the practices at his clinic. We also considered the detail that Webster often was not the person prescribing the medications to patients who eventually died. And there is the complicated nature of opioid prescribing. Despite an 11-year increase, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in accidental overdose deaths for this class of medications, there remains a hot debate about their utility for patients in chronic pain. We aimed to touch on at least some of these issues in our television piece; and dig a little deeper in a longer piece for CNN digital. Our focus on both platforms was on a case in which Webster was allegedly very involved -- that of Carol Ann Bosley. We also focused our efforts on unearthing more information about deaths at the clinic. The strength of our investigation lay with uncovering information that had previously been unreported -- in particular, allegations of improper involvement by Dr. Webster in the Utah medical examiner's determination about Bosley's cause of death. During a conversation with Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Bosley's husband also revealed a previously unreported item about Dr. Webster allegedly luring his wife back to treatment on opioids after she had kicked her habit. CNN also spoke on-camera with Bruce Webb, who lost a loved one after care at Lifetree, along with several others off-camera. Some sources of information about practices at Lifetree were gathered from people filing lawsuits against the clinic. We also mined information from people who had posted comments online about Lifetree Clinic (in one case we tracked down, after several weeks, a person who lost her mother after treatment there, who called the clinic "Deathtree.") CNN was able to use accounts from online posters to bolster the claims of our investigation. Repeated requests by CNN to the Utah Department of Professional Licensing for information about medical malpractice alleged against either Lifetree Clinic or Dr. Webster were denied. We received a handful of cases from that agency, with heavy redaction, none of which contained serious allegations. We pressed for weeks and, after many phone calls, through a source we were able to unearth a claim. It involved a woman who died of an overdose after receiving care at Lifetree, whose prescriptions soared while she was a patient. Of course with all of this information indicating alleged wrongdoing at Lifetree, under Dr. Webster's watch, we wanted his perspective. Through a spokesperson, Dr. Webster strenuously objected -- repeatedly -- to appearing on-camera to address allegations against him. Even when the request was framed in terms of clarifying his approach to opioid prescribing more generally, leaving out any patient claims, the doctor declined. Since our investigation, both on television and online, we spurred a renewed discussion on social media about painkiller use and abuse, and the role of doctors. Off-the-record, we hear that our reporting has spurred some movement in the DEA's continuing investigation of Dr. Webster.

    Tags: Lynn Webster; Drug Enforcement Agency; Opiod

    By Jennifer Bixler

    CNN

    2013

  • Hooked: Canada's Pill Problem

    Which Canadians pop the most pills? What's the correlation between prescription, abuse and deaths connected to potent opioids? What happens when you crack down on one widely abuse opioid - but only one? We created an original database tracking opioid prescriptions across provinces and compared that with data on abuse and opioid-related deaths. We spoke with people who've lost loved ones to opioid use, to the companies manufacturing these drugs and the policy-makers trying to combat their abuse. Our data shed new light on the topic and gave health ministers something new on which to act.

    Tags: Canada; pharmaceuticals; opioids; pills; database; prescriptions; policy-makers; drugs; abuse

    By Anna Mehler Paperny; Leslie Young

    Global TV News (Toronto)

    2013

  • APTN Investigates: Abuse of Process

    This story is about the exploitation of vulnerable individuals - Aboriginal survivors of government Indian Residential School - by the very people who were supposed to be advocating on their behalf. In this story, the latest in a series of feature and news stories, we learn about a thug employed by a lawyer who uses strong-arm tactics to enroll news clients into his lawyer's firm and to extort money from the survivors.

    Tags: lawyers

    By Kathleen Martens; Paul Barnsley

    APTN

    2013

  • DCS Under Fire

    DCS Under Fire is a collection of stories representing WREG’s coverage of problems at the Tennessee Department of Children’s Services. Our team began an in-depth investigation into the child welfare agency more than a year ago. The very agency charged with protecting the state’s most vulnerable had kids dying on its watch. We exposed unexplained deaths, questionable actions by case workers as well as failed technology and policies. Our continuous coverage raised concerns from parents, advocates and lawmakers. Since the start of our investigation, and later a court battle for access to public records, DCS has overhauled its staff and changed a number of policies and procedures to better protect children in its care.

    Tags: Department of Children Services; Welfare; Death; Abuse

    By Zaneta Lowe

    WREG-TV (Memphis, Tenn.)

    2013

  • Iowa Juvenile Home

    The stories initially examined the illegal use of physical restraints and long-term isolation cells at the Iowa Juvenile Home, an unlicensed and largely unregulated state-run facility that provides housing, schooling and treatment for children with serious behavioral problems. The Register discovered that state workers were routinely confining children as young as 13 to unfurnished, 10-foot-by-12-foot concrete-block isolation cells in the basement of the home’s schoolhouse. One girl spent almost a full year in one such cell. Court records showed the home had been using long-term isolation, sometimes in direct violation of a judge’s order, for at least 17 years. Former residents of the home, and their legal advocates, agreed to speak to the Register on the record, and on video, about the isolation cells and the manner in which they were used. Over the next five months,the Register published a string of exclusives that uncovered other abuses and failings within the home, leading to the governor's decision in December to close the 50-year-old facility.

    Tags: Iowa Juvenile Home; Children

    By Clark Kauffman

    Des Moines Register

    2013

  • Deadly Neglect

    Major change is now possible for residents at California’s 7,500 assisted living homes thanks to a team of reporters from U-T San Diego and the California HealthCare Foundation Center for Health Reporting at USC. It took a year’s worth of data-collection and analysis, examination of thousands of paper documents and shoe-leather journalism to produce “Deadly Neglect,” a series of stories that exposed death and abuse at assisted living facilities in San Diego County. The stories revealed that over the past seven years at least 27 deaths had occurred to assisted living residents in which negligence played a role. They found homes where residents were given wrong or no medication, and a state agency that didn’t keep track of the deaths it investigated. More than half a dozen state legislators,, outraged by the team’s findings, have announced the Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly Reform Act of 2014, a group of 14 reform bills that will be introduced in this year’s legislative session.

    Tags: Assisted Living; Death; Abuse; Medicine

    By Deborah Schoch, Jeff McDonald, Matt Clark, Paul Sisson

    U-T San Diego and the CHCF Center for Health Reporting

    2013

  • Betrayed by Silence

    Through the fall and winter of 2013, MPR News delivered a powerful collection of investigative radio stories that exposed how leaders of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis were continuing to cover-up the sexual abuse of children by priests. We found the archdiocese had hidden the names of abusive priests for decades, provided secret payments to pedophiles, and failed to report possible child pornography on a priest’s computer to police or warn parishioners of another priest’s sexual addiction. We exposed how two priests had secretly confessed to sexually abusing children decades ago –one was teaching sex education to troubled teenagers and the other was living half a block from a school. Our investigation peeled back the layers of false promises by leaders who had guided the national response to the clergy abuse scandal a decade earlier – and showed that children remained at risk.

    Tags: Archiocese; St. Paul; Minneapolis;

    By Madeleine Baran

    Minnesota Public Radio

    2013