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The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 26,000 investigative stories.

Most of our stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center directly at 573-882-3364573-882-3364  or rescntr@ire.org where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.



Search results for "dead" ...

  • Deadly Medicine

    The Wall Street Journal’s alarming revelations about a once common medical procedure had the powerful and lasting impact of saving lives. After nearly a year of Journal reporting, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration imposed strict limits on the device involved in the procedure. Doctors and hospitals curbed or abandoned the practice. Johnson & Johnson, the top manufacturer, pulled the device off the market. And women undergoing surgery were now armed with information that, for many, could determine life or death.

    Tags: women; medical; procedure; FDA

    By Jennifer Levitz; Jon Kamp; Thomas R. Burton; Joseph Walker

    Wall Street Journal (New York)

    2014

  • Below The Radar

    Mario Diaz exposed several of air traffic controllers returning to FAA towers or control centers with little or no accountability shortly after being a contributing factor to a deadly crash. As detailed in the series of “Below The Radar” reports, these crashes resulted in 104 deaths. The litigation produced from several of these crashes came at a steep price to American taxpayers. Diaz uncovered public records (Department of Treasury and Federal judgements) indicating that the Federal Government made either verdict or settlement payments in excess of $100-million dollars to the estate of the victims --- including the estate of the pilots involved in these crashes.

    Tags: air traffic controllers; FAA; accountability; taxpayers; deaths

    By Mario Diaz; Tom Miuccio; Amy Waldman; Dave Scanlon; Zack Smith; Ken Evsaroff; Eddie Lebron; Kenton Young; Noreen Lark; Macario Hernandez; Dan Mannerino; Jared Barnett

    WPIX-TV (New York)

    2014

  • Spearing Cars in the Name of Safety

    Guardrails on the nation's highways are supposed to protect us. Too often, though, they have inflicted harm. Patrick G. Lee investigated how a Texas company altered its taxpayer-funded guardrail system under the government's nose, to potentially deadly effect. Months before other media, Lee exposed the potential hazard posed by Trinity Industries Inc.'s ET-Plus end terminal, a 175-pound piece of steel mounted at the ends of a guardrail. Intended to absorb the force of a crash, some of them lock up, piercing cars and their occupants. Lee recounted one would-be whistleblower's cross-country quest, starting in late 2011, to learn why these systems were spearing cars. The discovery: Trinity had modified the ET-Plus more than a half-decade earlier without telling regulators. The newer version, modified to cut manufacturing costs, was malfunctioning, several plaintiffs alleged.

    Tags: guardrails; vehicles; safety; drivers

    By Patrick G. Lee

    Bloomberg Business News (Princeton, N.J.)

    2014

  • Deadly Mills

    The aftermath of two sawmill explosions in British Columbia, what caused them, and why regulatory charges were never laid, even though survivors, an industrial hygienist and the labor union insisted that the companies did not pay proper attention to warnings, and ignored the history of sawdust fires and explosions in North America. The explosions were preventable, but the companies did little or nothing to secure the mills while they were creating large amounts of particularly combustible sawdust.

    Tags: sawmill explosions; British Columbia; labor union; preventable; warnings ignored; combustible; workers' safety; broadcast

    By Jill Krop; Ian McBain; Kirk Neff; Claude Adams; Megan Rowney; Laurie Few

    Global News (Vancouver, BC)

    2014

  • Hired Guns

    Across the United States, there is a group of men and women who are given weapons and the imprimatur of law enforcement but who face almost no scrutiny: armed security guards. Until a CNN/The Center for Investigative Reporting investigation into the burgeoning industry, little was known about how haphazard and weak America’s standards were for training and regulating armed security guards. The result has left people dead and paralyzed, and families devastated.

    Tags: armed security guards; minimal oversight; guns; public safety; firearms training; broadcast

    By Drew Griffin; Patricia DiCarlo; Richard Griffiths; Wendy Bleiler; Scott Zamost; Shoshana Walter; Ryan Gabrielson; Robert Salladay; Narda Zacchino; Jennifer LaFleur; Robert Salladay

    CNN

    2014

  • The Coast Guard's deadly accidents

    Using never-before-reported data and compelling personal stories, G.W. Schulz with The Center for Investigative Reporting uncovered a disturbing trend in the Coast Guard. For years, the Guard has struggled with a string of deadly accidents because of poor training and lapses in judgment. More than two dozen aviators and other personnel have been killed in the air and at sea, including three who died after their helicopter crashed into power transmission wires that the Guard had been warned about but never fixed.

    Tags: Coast Guard; death

    By George Schulz

    Center for Investigative Reporting

    2014

  • Deadly Delays

    An investigation exposing deep flaws and deadly delays in the nation’s newborn screening programs that place thousands of babies at needless risk of disability and death.

    Tags: Natal care; disability; death

    By Ellen Gabler

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    2013

  • 60 Dead Inmates

    Between 2007 and 2012, 60 inmates died in San Diego County jail facilities, resulting in the county having the highest inmate mortality rate in California. It's a trend that's only gotten worse since a Bureau of Justice Statistics report showing that between 2000 and 2007, San Diego had the second highest death rate of California’s large jail systems. Through an exhaustive review of documents, CityBeat uncovered death attributed to excessive force by deputies, poor supervision of mentally ill and drug dependent inmates and a department that doesn't adhere to its own policies when it comes to monitoring the most at-risk inmates. This has resulted in at least five lawsuits against the county. We followed up our initial series by tracking deaths in 2013, and found continued lapses in policy and continued poor oversight of vulnerable inmates.

    Tags: Mortality rate; incarceration; lawsuit

    By Dave Maass and Kelly Davis

    San Diego CityBeat

    2013

  • Return to Benghazi

    In Return to Benghazi, Arwa Damon takes viewers back to the scene of a deadly embassy attack by unknown assailants. Damon's landmark reporting in this program led the U.S. to name the first suspect believed to be involved in the attack. On the night of September 11, 2012, four Americans including Ambassador Christopher Stevens were killed. It was a violent, well-coordinated attack that shocked the world. No one took responsibility for the killings. Libyan and U.S. officials did not know who to blame. A political firestorm erupted in the U.S. amongst lawmakers demanding to know what U.S. officials knew about the leadup to the attack. CNN's Arwa Damon arrived in Benghazi just days after the attack to cover the story. She spoke to witnesses and visited the compound where the Ambassador lived. It was there where she found Ambassador Stevens' diary. The FBI and the Libyan government vowed to find those responsible and bring them to justice, but justice did not come swiftly. It would be weeks before FBI teams would inspect the crime scene. Months passed and still no suspects were identified. Several months after the attack, Arwa Damon goes back to Benghazi to get an update on the investigation. She finds a changed city where westerners have fled and citizens face unexplained violence. Militias increasingly rule the streets and security forces struggle to keep control. Even more omonous, are the alarming signs of support for Al Qaeda that have emerged in less than a year. Damon tracks down the headquarters of Ansar Al Sharia, a group many Libyans and U.S. officials suspected might be behind the attack, but the group isn't talking. She also speaks to a Libyan rebel intelligence chief who blames a factions of Al Quada for the attack. The government is reluctant to move against either of them. In a rare interview, Arwa Damon sits down with a man U.S. officials have often suggested they would be interested in speaking to about the night of the attack: Ahmed Abu Khattala. He admits to Damon that he was at the compound that night while the attack was taking place. He also tells her no one from the FBI had tried to contact him, but that he would be willing to meet with them if it was a conversation and not an interrogation. After the program aired, an outraged U.S. Representative Jason Chaffetz told reporters, "News out today that CNN was able to go in and talk to one of the suspected terrorists, how come the military hasn't been able to get after them and capture or kill the people? How come the FBI isn't doing this and yet CNN is?" U.S. federal authorities then filed charges against against Khattala, suspecting him for being involved in the attack. Arwa Damon's reporting in Return to Benghazi not only showcased the powerful investigative journalism that CNN is known for, but it also sparked movement in the stalled investigation of the September 11, 2012 embassy attack.

    Tags: Benghazi; al-qaeda; 9/11

    By Jon Adler

    CNN

    2013

  • How Kids Get Caught in Chicago's Deadly Gun Trap

    Told through the perspective of a killer out on parole, this is the story of how gang members influence kids, teaching them to sell drugs and shoot guns to get money, power and respect. The story also reveals that if juveniles do get caught with guns in Chicago, they still rarely get punished. Even fewer get sent to juvenile detention. Gangbangers use that to their advantage to lure kids into violent lives of crime.

    Tags: Parole; Gangs

    By Mark Konkol

    DNAinfo.com

    2013