Resource Center

Stories

 

 

 

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 26,000 investigative stories — both print and broadcast.

These stories are searchable online or by contacting the Resource Center directly (573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org) where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Browse or search the tipsheet section of our library below. Stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center.

 

 

 



Search results for "dead" ...

  • The Forgotten Dead

    Columbia College Chicago students spent a year investigating unsolved homicides in Chicago, determining that police repeatedly failed to follow department policy that required detectives to have occasional contact with murder victims' families. Despite numerous roadblocks - including being denied even basic information about dozens of homicide cases and police officials refusing to be interviewed - students were able to give voice to the families and friends of homicide victims.

    Tags: Homicide; police; murder

    By Suzanne McBride

    ChicagoTalks, AustinTalks, WBEZ (Chicago Public Radio) and the Chicago Sun-Times

    2013

  • Deadly Neglect

    Major change is now possible for residents at California’s 7,500 assisted living homes thanks to a team of reporters from U-T San Diego and the California HealthCare Foundation Center for Health Reporting at USC. It took a year’s worth of data-collection and analysis, examination of thousands of paper documents and shoe-leather journalism to produce “Deadly Neglect,” a series of stories that exposed death and abuse at assisted living facilities in San Diego County. The stories revealed that over the past seven years at least 27 deaths had occurred to assisted living residents in which negligence played a role. They found homes where residents were given wrong or no medication, and a state agency that didn’t keep track of the deaths it investigated. More than half a dozen state legislators,, outraged by the team’s findings, have announced the Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly Reform Act of 2014, a group of 14 reform bills that will be introduced in this year’s legislative session.

    Tags: Assisted Living; Death; Abuse; Medicine

    By Deborah Schoch, Jeff McDonald, Matt Clark, Paul Sisson

    U-T San Diego and the CHCF Center for Health Reporting

    2013

  • Deadly Consequences: Cops Caught Speeding

    "Cops Caught Speeding" is an in-depth investigation of the national problem of police officers speeding on the job."20/20"'s Matt Gutman examines several high-profile cases of cops accused of speeding needlessly -- sometimes 30mph or more over the legal speed limits -- behavior that ended in several tragic deaths that victim families say could have been prevented. "20/20" travels to North Carolina, home of several recent speeding-related police crashes, to catch speeding cops in the act -- and then confront N.C. state police with the evidence. This two-part "20/20" investigative series is the first national news program to shine a light on this widespread police misconduct, and the deadly, untold human toll.

    Tags: Police

    By Matt Gutman

    ABC News

    2013

  • Civilian Casualties in Afghanistan

    This multi-part print and online investigation, including an extensive, interactive database of incidents involving the deaths of Afghan civilians at the hands of U.S and allied forces, provides the first comprehensive look into collateral damage in the war in Afghanistan over the years 2001 through 2013.* Approximately 30,000 words in all, the package of articles uncovers faulty and profoundly inadequate efforts to count the dead and to keep track of civilian casualties, the gaps and missteps involved in efforts by the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) and its office for protection of civilians to account for civilian casualties, serious flaws in the U.S. military’s (classified) database called the Civilian Casualty Tracking Cell (and parallel units), and the lack of any serious effort by the Pentagon to create an Office of Civilian Protection for “lessons learned.” The package examines the practice of lethal profiling of so-called “military age males” throughout the U.S. chain of command and exposes its pernicious effect on American rules of engagement in Afghanistan. It also reports on studies, including those performed by the U.S. military itself, on the measurable and quantifiable effect of civilian casualties in “creating insurgents.” In additional features published online, we report on the haphazard record-keeping and lack of a coherent policy when it comes to payment of reparations for civilians killed in Afghanistan. And we closely examine three mass-casualty incidents involving Afghan civilians, tracing how they resulted from changes in the Pentagon’s own commander directives and guidelines to the troops in the field. *The interactive database concludes at the end of 2012, the last year for which a full data set was available at the time of publication.

    Tags: Civilian casualties; United Nations; U.S. Military

    By Nick Turse

    The Nation/The Investigative Fund

    2013

  • Nuclear Missteps

    Beginning with his discovery of an internal Air Force admission of "rot" infesting its nuclear missile forces, AP National Security Writer Robert Burns probed to extraordinary depths within this highly secretive, rarely investigated organization for eight months to reveal a series of missteps by men and women with their finger on the trigger of the world's most deadly weapons. Using sources inside and outside the Air Force, in Washington and beyond, Burns documented deliberate safety and security violations, personal misbehavior, training failures, leadership lapses and chilling evidence of malaise among those entrusted with nuclear weapons. Burns peeled away the veneer of Air Force assurances that nothing was amiss, and brought to the attention of the American public a fuller picture of a nuclear missile force facing an uncertain future. His reporting prompted the Secretary of Defense, Chuck Hagel, to lament these "troubling lapses" and make a personal visit tot he force to insist they live up to their standards and demonstrate that they can be trusted with nuclear responsibilities.

    Tags: nuclear weapons; air force

    By Robert Burns

    Associated Press

    2013

  • Force at the Border

    On Oct. 10, 2012, one or more Border Patrol agents shot an unarmed Mexican teenager 10 times in the back and head, firing through the border fence from Arizona into Nogales, Mexico. Agents said Jose Antonio Elena Rodriguez had thrown rocks at them. But their version of events didn’t square with the facts. As Arizona Republic reporters dug further into that killing and into 41 other cases of deadly force by on-duty Border Patrol agents, they found that agents who use deadly force face few if any public repercussions, even when the cases appear dubious. They found that agents who kill are protected by a culture of secrecy at Customs and Border Protection. The country’s largest law-enforcement body, CBP also is among the least transparent – in fact, its policies fly in the face of best practices recommended by national police organizations. The investigation found previously unreported deaths at the hands of agents. It found that hundreds of Border Patrol agents didn’t use deadly force, despite facing the same circumstances as the agents who killed. In addition, it examined why border deaths don't spark outrage and how the Border Patrol is increasingly backing up local police and conducting local police duties.

    Tags: border patrol; customs and border protection; police

    By Bob Ortega, Rob O'Dell, Daniel Gonzalez

    Arizona Republic (Phoenix)

    2013

  • Made in Bangladesh

    Following two deadly factory disasters, Fault Lines traces Bangladesh’s garment supply chain to investigate whether U.S. retailers like Walmart and Gap know where their clothes are being made. In November 2012, a fire at the Tazreen Fashions factory in Bangladesh killed at least 112 people. Walmart’s Faded Glory brand shorts were among the clothing found in the charred remains. Walmart blamed its supplier, saying the order had been subcontracted to Tazreen without its authorization. But as Fault Lines follows the paper trail of the Faded Glory order, what some call an “open secret” is revealed: that corporations deliberately turn a blind eye to the practice of subcontracting. The owner of the factory at the center of the Faded Glory order describes how it ended up in Tazreen, and an insider explains how retailers cut corners to keeps prices low. To confirm the allegations, Fault Lines visits an unauthorized finishing house, where children as young as 12 are unexpectedly found working on Old Navy products.

    Tags: international retail factories

    By Mat Skene, Paul Sapin, Laila Al-Arian, Anjali Karmat, Tum Gruzca, Andy Bowley, Warwick Meade, Joel Van Haren, Omar Mullick, Laura Gutierrez, Anuradha Hasemi, Masrur Rahman Masud, Nafeesa Syeed, Jonathan Klett, Mark Scialla, David Michaels, Omar Duwaji

    Al Jazeera America

    2013

  • Police Misconduct on Long Island hidden by secrecy law and weak oversight

    A nine-month Newsday investigation found that Long Island law enforcement agencies have breached the trust of the citizens they are paid to protect by using New York State’s officer privacy law to hide egregious cases of police misconduct, ranging from falsifying reports and lying to shooting innocent people. Newsday obtained and published portions of previously secret internal affairs investigations, confidential deadly force investigative reports and more than 6 hours of recorded Internal Affairs interviews. The paper’s effort revealed dozens of previously secret misconduct cases and informed the public of the law that helps keep those records hidden from inspection. Without Newsday, the public might never have learned the scope and breadth of offenses being committed in secret by the officers sworn to protect them.

    Tags: foia; police; privacy laws; police misconduct; internal affairs

    By Gus Garcia-Roberts; Sandra Peddie; Adam Playford; Will Van Sant; Aisha-Al Muslim; Matt Clark; Nicole Fuller; Mark Harrington; David Schwartz; Matthew Doig; Jamshid Mousavinezhad; Erin Geismar; Saba Ali; Michael Aguggia; Matthew Cassella

    Newsday (New York)

    2013

  • Deadly Delays

    Nearly every baby born in the United States has blood collected within a day or two of birth to be screened for dozens of genetic disorders. Each year, newborn screening is credited with saving or improving the lives of more than 12,000 babies in the United States. The entire premise of newborn screening is to detect disorders quickly so babies can be treated early, averting death and preventing or limiting brain damage, disability and a lifetime of costly medical care. The investigation found that thousands of hospitals — and dozens of state agencies that oversee the programs — are failing America’s children due to an ineffective and unaccountable newborn screening system wracked by deadly delays. As a result, children who should be diagnosed and treated shortly after birth are suffering preventable brain damage, disability and even death — as if they had been born decades before today’s screening tests and treatments were available. In an analysis of nearly 3 million newborn screening tests from throughout the country, the Journal Sentinel found that hundreds of thousands of blood samples from newborn babies arrive late at labs where they are to be tested. Despite very clear and dramatic warnings to send blood samples to state labs within 24 hours, many hospitals don’t comply, and instead wait days and then send blood samples in batches, saving a few dollars in postage. Problem hospitals throughout the country face no consequences and often are not even notified they are putting babies’ lives at risk.

    Tags: newborn; delays; hospitals; blood samples; babies

    By Ellen Gabler; Mark Johnson; John Fauber; Allan James Vestal; Kristyna Wentz-Graff

    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

    2013

  • Trail of Dirty Deeds

    A 41 Action News investigation uncovered a widespread real estate fraud scheme in the Kansas City area, comprised of forged signatures of both the living and the dead. The investigation exposed how the crime is “shockingly easy” to pull off, leaving victims to pay thousands of dollars in legal fees to fix the damage one forged signature can cause. The ongoing reports later discovered potential changes to Missouri state law that could help thwart the problem of stealing homes.

    Tags: real estate; fraud; signature

    By Ryan Kath

    KSHB-TV (Kansas City

    2013