Resource Center

Stories

 

 

 

The IRE Resource Center is a major research library containing more than 26,000 investigative stories — both print and broadcast.

These stories are searchable online or by contacting the Resource Center directly (573-882-3364 or rescntr@ire.org) where a researcher can help you pinpoint what you need.

Browse or search the tipsheet section of our library below. Stories are not available for download but can be easily ordered by contacting the Resource Center.

 

 

 



Search results for "medical center" ...

  • Ken and Rosie

    After many months of negotiation, NBC News’ Senior Investigative correspondent Lisa Myers and Rock Center producer Diane Beasley gained exclusive, unprecedented access to the highly secretive world of biomedical research and one of the few labs in the country that still uses chimpanzees in invasive research, The Texas Biomedical Research Institute. Our report took viewers inside the lab to see how the chimps live and explored the raging ethical and scientific debate over using our closest relative for invasive biomedical research. We spotlighted the plight of 2 aging chimps with health problems, ”Ken and Rosie,” who have spent virtually all 30 years of their lives in research labs, and undergone many painful procedures and raised the question of whether they now deserve to be retired to a sanctuary. We obtained the chimps medical records and revealed that both have serious health problems, even though the lab claims they are healthy and perfect candidates for research. We asked tough questions of the Director of the Primate Center, Dr. John VandeBerg, who asserted that his lab provides a high quality of life for chimpanzees and is just as good as a sanctuary so they should live out their lives in labs.. He said “I think of chimpanzees in the same way that I think of a library. There are many books in the library that will never be used this year or next year. Many of them might never be used again. But we don't know which ones will be needed tomorrow, next year or the year after." Scientists here claim “invasive” research usually is just a needle prick or a blood draw. But, under questioning, a scientist admits that 5 chimps here have died in the last decade during research. Then, we went to the national chimpanzee sanctuary in Louisiana—known as CHIMP HAVEN—to contrast the life for retired lab chimpanzees there to that in the lab and show that some retired chimpanzees still haven’t recovered from their life of confinement and experimentation. The stories featured primatologist Jane Goodall and included compelling footage of chimps she helped release from a lab in Austria when they finally were free to go outside for the first time. She argues that these creatures are so intelligent that all invasive research is torture and that, given their age and medical problems, Ken and Rosie, in particular deserve to be retired.

    Tags: Health; Texas Biomedical Research Institute

    By Diane Beasley; Lisa Myers

    NBC News

    2012

  • University President Syndrome

    An investigation into alleged misspending by the president of a prestigious medical school in Dallas.

    Tags: UT Southwestern Medical Center; President; Misappropriation; Dallas

    By Reese Dunklin; Sue Goetinck Ambrose

    Dallas Morning News

    2012

  • 98 Minutes

    "98 Minutes" is a collaborative multimedia investigation by WBEZ and the Center for Public Integrity. The project examines the death of a temporary worker due to burns he suffered on the job at a Chicago-area factory. It also examines crucial workplace-safety enforcement issues affecting temporary workers, a growing part of the U.S. labor force. Our reporting found that these temp workers face distinct hazards and that the federal government isn’t keeping close track of their injuries. Highlights of the investigation include (a) data, acquired and analyzed by WBEZ, that expose the lack of federal record-keeping concerning temp-worker injuries and (b) a U.S. Occupational Health and Safety Administration internal memorandum, acquired by CPI, that recommends criminal prosecution for alleged safety violations found during inspections triggered by the death, (c) recorded comments from top national OSHA officials recorded in ambush-style settings after the agency had failed to grant repeated interview requests and (d) recorded comments from a recently retired top regional OSHA official who suggested a way for the agency to step up inspections of temp-worker job sites. The project, co-reported by WBEZ’s Chip Mitchell and CPI’s Jim Morris, includes five components: (1) a 12-minute broadcast story, (2) a 3,500-word text story, (3) a timeline with still photos and text enabling web visitors to follow the 98 minutes between the worker’s accident and his arrival at an appropriate medical facility, (4) data visualizations showing the growing number of U.S. temporary workers and the lack of federal records about their injuries and (5) a 25-minute conversation about temporary-worker hazards and safety enforcement. The conversation, broadcast live and recorded for web streaming, includes experts and listener callers.

    Tags: workplace safety; OSHA; injuries; temporary workers

    By Chip Mitchell; Jim Morris

    Center for Public Integrity

    2012

  • Diabetes Test Strip Resale: A Million-Dollar Grey Market

    Diabetes is an epidemic in the US. It’s also a billion dollar industry. One of the most important aspects of diabetes care is a one-time use plastic strip that patients use to monitor their blood sugar. An investigation by KUOW Public Radio found that this little plastic strip is at the center of a million dollar grey market.

    Tags: Murphy; diabetes; medical

    By Patricia Murphy

    KUOW

    2012

  • Los Angeles VA Has Made Millions on Rental Deals

    This story is about one of the most fought-over pieces of property in Los Angeles, the 400 acre Veterans Affairs Medical Center campus in West Los Angeles. It’s in an affluent neighborhood and has been a target of developers. But with many unused buildings, it’s also been coveted as a place to house some of L.A.’s 8,000 homeless veterans. That was the original use of the land, which was donated for an Old Soldiers’ Home in the late 19th century. The VA has not acted on plans announced in 2007 to begin rehabbing unused buildings there for housing for homeless vets. Meanwhile, it’s rented out land and buildings to commercial enterprises. There is no public accounting for this income. Through FOIA and other documents, we found that the VA is renting out the property using a law intended for sharing health care resources, though the renters are non-health related commercial enterprises. We were also able to estimate that the VA has taken in at least 28 million and possibly more than 40 million dollars over the past dozen years, far more than the cost of re-habbing a building to house homeless vets.

    Tags: Property; neighborhood; land uses; veterans

    By Reporter, Ina Jaffe; Editors: Quinn O’Toole; Stephen Drummond

    National Public Radio

    2012

  • No Small Thing

    The Poughkeepsie Journal series “No Small Thing” goes where no other newspaper or media outlet has – it challenges the mainstream medical dogma on Lyme disease. In rigorously documented articles, Projects Writer Mary Beth Pfeiffer concludes that the major actors in this public health scandal -- chiefly the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Infectious Disease Society of America – have minimized and mismanaged a burgeoning epidemic of tick-borne disease at great harm to thousands of infected people. These two powerful institutions have held – in policy and pronouncement -- that Lyme disease is easy to diagnose and easy to cure. It is neither.

    Tags: Media coverage; public health; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; CDC

    By Mary Beth Pfeiffer

    The Poughkeepsie Journal

    2012

  • Wired for Waste

    A Charleston Gazette investigation found the state of West Virginia used $24 million in federal stimulus funds to buy oversized routers that weren't needed. The high-end routers were designed to serve research universities, corporations and major medical centers, but the state installed the pricey devices primarily in small schools and libraries. The routers cost $22,600 each. The newspaper discovered that a high-ranking state technology office administrator warned that the routers were "grossly oversized," but the state's homeland security director and commerce secretary ignored the warning and authorized the purchase.

    Tags: Federal funds; routers

    By Eric Eyre

    Gazette (Charleston, W.Va.)

    2012

  • Human Tissue Donation

    It’s a billion dollar business that begins with an act of generosity: When someone or their family agrees to donate a person’s body, for free, after death. When they click the “donor” box on their driver’s license application, most organ donors don’t realize that they have also agreed to donate their tissue. They’ve made a legally binding promise that a private company can take skin, bones, tendons, ligaments and anything that’s not a living organ—and turn it into for-profit medical products. In a four part radio series that aired in July 2012, NPR Correspondent Joseph Shapiro highlighted this little known industry and the shortcomings in regulation that raise concerns among donors, medical professionals, and government officials at many levels. The series was part of a collaboration between NPR’s Investigative Unit and the International Consortium for of Investigative Journalists, a project of the Center for Public Integrity.

    Tags: Human tissue donation; organ donors; ICIJ; Center for Public Integrity

    By Steven Drummond; Sandra Bartlett; Robert Benincasa; Alicia Cypress; Nelson Hsu; Susanne Reber; Kevin Uhrmacher; Barbara Van Woerkom; Angela Wong

    National Public Radio

    2012

  • What Killed Arafat?

    This 50-minute film was the result of a nine month long cold case investigation into the suspicious death of Yasser Arafat, Palestine's iconic, revolutionary leader. After obtaining Arafat's entire original medical files, Al Jazeera's Investigative Unit, led by producer and reporter Clayton Swisher, crossed continents to track down and interview the French, Jordanian, Egyptian, and Palestinian doctors who had worked to save Arafat's life. Part I of "What Killed Arafat?" was able to easily shatter popular myths about what caused Arafat's precipitous decline from the onset of his illness on October 12, 2004 until his death on November 11th. Testimony from Arafat's doctors conclusively ruled out liver cirrhosis, cancer, even rumors of HIV. The scientific, evidence-based discoveries made in the Part II result from the work performed by a team of forensic pathologists, toxicologists, and radiation physicists from the University Center for Legal Medicine and Institute for Radiation Physics in Lausanne, Switzerland. Working without payment, they agreed to run a battery of sophisticated tests on a large gym bag containing Arafat’s last personal effects. The scientists discovered significant levels of reactor-made Polonium 210 contaminating areas of Arafat's personal effects that came into contact with his biological fluids. When the final results came back in late June, Al Jazeera hosted Mrs. Arafat in Doha to watch the Swiss explain the results on set. Upon witnessing their testimony, Ms. Arafat made a resolute, unanticipated surprise announcement, calling on the Palestinian Authority to exhume her husband's body for testing. Yasser Arafat’s body was exhumed on November 27, 2012 so that the final samples could be retrieved. Whether the causes of Arafat's death are determined to be natural, inconclusive—or even murder—suffice it to say that Al Jazeera’s "What Killed Arafat?" and the resulting investigations and exhumation will have inched the world closer to understanding what did not, and possibly for the first time, what did claim the life of this historic and controversial personality.

    Tags: Science; death; biology; investigation; exhumation; testing

    By Directors: Adrian Billing; Clayton Swisher; Writer: Clayton Swisher; Talent: Clayton Swisher; Videographers: Adrian Billing; Nick Porter; Karsten Sondergaard; Editors: Adrian Billing; Gautam Singh

    Al Jazeera English

    2012

  • Wounded Warriors

    The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review began following up on tips worldwide from military personnel inside the Warrior Transition Units, the special military-medical wards constructed in the aftermath of the scandal at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington D.C. After months of gathering leaked documents and compiling numerous interviews at bases nationwide, especially with soldiers, the Tribune leaked reams of secret reports detailing the Pentagon's own inspection of medical wards.

    Tags: Military Personnel; Walter Reed Army Medical Center; Washington D.C. Documents

    By Carl Prine, Justin Merriman

    Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

    2011